Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day - December 2022

There isn't a lot of blooming going on in my garden at the moment, but here's a taste of what is.


Wedelia, always a dependable bloomer.

If it is December, then of course the loquat is in bloom. 

Turk's cap.

The little lemon tree, gifted to me by my children to replace my old tree that finally succumbed to the cold last winter, is now in bloom.

Purple oxalis, constant bloomer.

Sweet-smelling almond verbena perfumes my entire backyard.

                                                 Yellow cestrum.


                                                      Carolina jessamine.


This azalea, the variety name of which I've forgotten, was gifted to me on the death of my mother in 2004, so it has significant sentimental value for me. I think it holds the record for the longest I've been able to keep a potted plant alive.


The glowing orange of the Cape Honeysuckle blooms light up my backyard.


                                             Lantana - always in bloom.


                                                 'Pink Knockout' rose.


                                                'Julia Child' rose.


                          'Belinda's Dream' rose - always dreamy in bloom.

And that's about it. As I said, not much going on, but these "old dependables" are very much appreciated.

Once again, thanks to Carol of May Dreams Gardens for hosting this monthly meme and a very happy Bloom Day to all. I hope you and your garden are flourishing. 


Comments

  1. Is that all? No, not trying to be snarky. Rather, this was such a sight for my eyes in the midst of a sleet/snowstorm, and I could have wished that your display went on for a few more minutes. Lemon! I can imagine it having a scent like the orange trees I remember from my couple of years in Florida. Loquat - flowers so pretty. Carolina jessamine - memories of various trips to North and South Carolina. Thank you thank you!

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    Replies
    1. My offerings are quite paltry compared to most Bloom Day posts but I'm very happy to have them.

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  2. You're lucky to still have green and blossoming plants in your yard. My yard is a sea of white; it's been snowing all week. We're well over 14 inches now...which is good for the drought, but I'm a little tired of driving on snowy streets.

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    Replies
    1. 14 inches! Oh, my! One inch brings everything to a halt around here. I can only imagine what 14 inches would do to us!

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  3. Beautiful!
    Happy Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Quite a few of lovely blooms! Growing up we had loquats. Tasty, but mostly seed, hardly worth nibbling on!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My plant always produces a few fruits but I leave them for the birds.

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  5. I hope to get some lantana this year. All that is blooming at my house are Turk's Cap, Beauty Berries, and Blue Mistflower. How lovely it is that you still have the azalea that was given to you after your mother's death.

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    Replies
    1. My beautyberries are well into their "berry" stage by now. The ones with white berries have already been plucked clean by the birds. The traditional purple still have quite a few berries on them.

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  6. Gorgeous. I love these pictures. Is the Azalea really still blooming now? I like the orange Honeysuckle. Wow nice!

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    Replies
    1. The azalea has just started blooming. I forget its variety name but it is 'Christmas something' and it does start to bloom around this time of year. It will continue to have blooms for several weeks.

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  7. My word, that is profusion compared with my snowy backyard!

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    Replies
    1. No snow here. Our high today is predicted to be 61 degrees F which actually seems cool to us.

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  8. My "old dependables" are very different but I'm grateful for every one of them. Sadly, they don't include roses, which have for all practical purposes given up on my garden after 3 straight years of poor rainfall. I wonder if lemon verbena would bloom here in winter too - I'll have to plant some to see!

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    Replies
    1. The lemon verbena is a very hardy and forgiving plant. I suspect it might do just fine in your climate.

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