This week in birds - #526

 A roundup of the week's news of birds and the environment:

It's just about time for the return of the Sandhill Cranes. This picture was actually taken a few years ago. I haven't seen any of them yet this fall, although there probably are some around; I just haven't encountered them.

*~*~*~*

The U.N. Climate Change Conference was in session this week and a proposal was submitted that would tap private funds to provide assistance to developing countries for clean energy development.

*~*~*~*

This story documents some of the changes taking place on planet Earth because of climate change.

*~*~*~*

The world's four biggest emitters of greenhouse gases are primarily responsible for the planet falling short of its climate goals.

*~*~*~*

The intergovernmental body charged with protecting and conserving marine life in the Antarctic Ocean has ended its annual meeting with little progress made.

*~*~*~*

The "gloomy octopus" is the actual common name of a species and it lives up to that name by throwing things at other members of its species.

*~*~*~*

And then there is the argonaut octopus that produces a floating shell-like structure for the protection of its offspring.

*~*~*~*

How do seabirds survive typhoons? It turns out that many of them fly straight into the winds rather than risk being blown inland.

*~*~*~*

Some European countries at COP27 pledged money for a new loss and damage fund. The United States did not join them. 

*~*~*~*

Deep-sea divers have discovered a new ecosystem 1640 feet beneath the surface of the Indian Ocean. It is an ecosystem that is filled with sharks.

*~*~*~*

Here are some amazing photographs of wildlife visiting a man-made waterhole in Kenya.

*~*~*~*

Meanwhile, Jordan, one of the driest countries on Earth, is running out of water.

*~*~*~*

Ten African countries have accused the EU of jeopardizing the survival of the hippopotamus by failing to support a proposed commercial trade ban.

*~*~*~*

It is somewhat quail-like in appearance but it is, in fact, a rail. It is the Yellow Rail and its numbers are decreasing. It is the American Bird Conservancy's Bird of the Week.  

*~*~*~*

How do you rescue a whale, often frightened, angry, pehaps injured, and resisting, that is entangled in a fishing net?

*~*~*~*

Here is Book Riot's list of eight of the very best books about birding. 

*~*~*~*

Puerto Ricans know they will have to deal with hurricanes but they are determined to find ways not only to survive but to thrive with a new vision of agriculture.

*~*~*~*

The filming of the screen adaptation of The Lord of the Rings and all of its offshoots has had an environmental impact on New Zealand that is some cause for concern.

*~*~*~*

Naturalists fear that the proposed restart of crab harvesting in Delaware Bay poses a threat to shorebirds that frequent the bay.

*~*~*~*

Is the "wood-wide web" a thing? In other words, do trees actually talk to each other? Scientists disagree about it - it's what scientists do. But I am completely convinced that they do communicate.

*~*~*~*

Thanks to Mexican conservation efforts, that magnificent cat, the jaguar, is making a comeback in the Yucatan.

*~*~*~*

The springtail is an insect just about the size of a pinhead but it is capable of some truly amazing jumps.

*~*~*~*

The polar ice sheets are melting and that could cause catastrophic sea rise that could threaten coastal cities.

*~*~*~*

Brazil, Indonesia, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo are in talks to form a strategic alliance to protect their tropical rainforests. 

*~*~*~*

A perfectly placed trail cam in Minnesota has given us views of animals using a beaver dam as a highway.

*~*~*~*

A report from a project called Climate Trace states that oil and gas greenhouse emissions are about three times higher than their producers have claimed. 

*~*~*~*

A pristine marine preserve that serves as a sea turtle sanctuary in the Philippines is threatened by the effects of climate change.

*~*~*~*

Apparently, there are ordinary people out there buying emus "on a whim." Truly, the human race may be doomed by its own stupidity.

*~*~*~*

A nonprofit offered to lend Belize money to pay its creditors if the government would spend part of the savings produced to preserve its marine resources. And that's how Belize cut its debt by fighting global warming.

*~*~*~*

The 1200 indigenous Guna people of Gardi Sugdub Island in Panama will have to move to the mainland next year because their island is sinking into the sea.

*~*~*~*

Ponds don't necessarily get the love and respect they deserve but scientists tell us they have a key role in fighting climate change and aiding conservation. I know my life would be poorer without the little pond in my backyard.

*~*~*~*

A 3700-year-old ivory comb that was used to remove beard lice (according to the inscription on it) has been unearthed by archaeologists in Israel.

*~*~*~*

Finally, here's a video of two rescued baby beavers diligently building "dams" to keep their rivals out of their space.



Comments

  1. Good morning, Dorothy: Thank you for the weekly roundup, especially important as the talking heads are all meeting in Egypt to blather and dine on canapés. Who knows, some leaders may go home and actually do something, but don't hold your breath. I watched Nancy Pelosi talk about her "colleagues" who don't even believe in climate change and call the whole thing a hoax. Those "colleagues" didn't get the sweep they had hoped for but they will have much more influence, nevertheless. I was interested to see the list of the best birding books, three of which I have, but I would disagree with their choices for the most part. There are some outstanding books that have been ignored. That's inevitable, I suppose. Hope the Sandhill Cranes come to see you soon. Best wishes from an abnormally (well maybe becoming normal) November in Ontario - David

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I choose to hope that something positive may come from the international meeting called COP27. It's good for countries to talk - much better than the alternative.

      Delete
  2. I was underwhelmed by the list of best nonfiction books about birds, but I clicked on to the fiction list and found it to be exceptional.

    Our Changing World in Pictures...a powerful overview of what's going on in the world because of climate change...

    It's good to hear that small ponds have a role in fighting climate change, and that you have one in your own backyard.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have a good-sized shelf of nonfiction bird books and none of mine made their list.

      When I say my pond is small, I mean REALLY small - maybe eight feet at its widest - but it's big enough for a few goldfish and the resident frogs and it is a wildlife attractant.

      Delete
  3. The photos at the Kenya watering hole are amazing. I once stayed at a small lodge near a waterhole in Africa and we saw much wildlife. It was a thrill. I'm also quite interested in the story about the jaguar's revival ... I just saw a TV program on Ocelot conservation ... that also spoke about the Jaguars ... I think they share some of the same geography. It's awesome to see good news about the jaguars

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am so envious that you got to visit Africa! And I agree that it is great to have some positive news about the status of jaguars.

      Delete
  4. Denis and I love going to Whitewater Draw down in Cochise County, Arizona to see thousands of sandhill cranes. Once you hear the sound of all those calls, you never forget it. It can still send chills down my spine. And speaking of Cochise County, I hope that jaguars make their way back across the border. The last time we stayed in Ramsey Canyon, El Jefe (jaguar) had been spotted several times.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The picture of the cranes that I featured today was taken in New Mexico a few autumns ago. I agree that seeing them en masse and hearing their calls is an unforgettable experience.

      Delete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Poetry Sunday: Hymn for the Hurting by Amanda Gorman

Poetry Sunday: Don't Hesitate by Mary Oliver

Open Season (Joe Pickett #1) by C.J. Box - A review