This week in birds - #523

 A roundup of the week's news of birds and the environment:

A Buff-bellied Hummingbird sips from a feeder in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas.

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An Energy Department study has found that the wildfires in the West affect not only the area where they occur but they fuel extreme weather in the other states as well. 

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In Alaska, billions of snow crabs have disappeared from the waters around the state and as a result, officials have canceled the snow crab season.

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Twenty nations that are at high risk from climate change are considering halting repayments on their debts and plowing the money into conservation instead.

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The American Bird Conservancy's Bird of the Week is the little Buff-breasted Sandpiper, a bird that once numbered in the millions but is now uncommon and its numbers are decreasing even further.

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The drought is causing such low water levels in the Mississippi River that ancient shipwrecks are being uncovered.

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Climate change that makes precipitation and snow melt less predictable is forcing changes to the way of life in the Pacific Northwest.

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The establishment of Hawaii's marine reserve area has proved to be a boon to overfished tuna populations and is helping them to recover.

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The Biden administration is one step closer to making a massive West Coast wind farm a reality.

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As their environment changes with the melting of glacial ice, bighorn sheep and mountain goats are finding themselves in competition for the same territory. It's a competition that the goats almost always win.

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Here are some pictures of birds in early autumn on the Salish Sea.

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Here's a strange phenomenon: It seems that Erect-crested Penguins on the Antipodes Islands in the South Pacific willingly abandon one-half of the eggs that they lay. 

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The Brazilian Amazon is being deforested to make way for cattle ranching.

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When plans are made to combat the effects of climate change, too often the needs of people with disabilities are not considered.

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North Dakota seems to be a treasure trove of mummified dinosaurs. It's a treasure trove that has long fascinated the public as well as paleontologists.

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The wonderfully-named sarcastic fringehead fish is a creature to reckon with.

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Is this Earth's oldest tree? It is a bristlecone pine that lives in the Inyo National Forest in California. These trees can live 5,000 years or more.

Comments

  1. Good morning, Dorothy; thank you as always for the roundup. There. An awful irony that nations most affected by climate change are those who had little role in causing it, yet now have to make a choice between paying their debts to the instruments of finance for those who did, or investing their scarce funds in remediating the e damag

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  2. I have no idea what happened above. My screen suddenly flashed and the comment somehow or other got posted with being completed or corrected.....but there is probably enough there for you to get the drift.

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    1. Yes, I think you came through loud and clear in spite of any Blogger problems! And I couldn't agree more with the sense of your statement that those who now suffer most from the effects of climate change are those who are least responsible for contributing to it. Of course, eventually we are all going to suffer.

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  3. Dorothy, I am so grateful for your roundup each week. I share it on my facebook page. Blessings to you and your family!

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    1. You are very kind and thank you for sharing the roundup with others.

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  4. Another round-up that gives me plenty to think about. Thanks for doing these, Dorothy. (They're destroying the Amazon so the world can have plenty of Big Macs?!? It makes me want to bash my head against a wall.)

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    1. Personally, I'm more than happy to live without Big Macs. I share your frustration with people who would prioritize fast food over preserving an irreplaceable environment.

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  5. Wow that old tree is fantastic looking! Thx for the round-up. I'm going to have to read about the snow crabs.

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    1. I do love the look of that old tree. That's why I had to include its picture.

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  6. It seems strange to think that a bird might abandon half of its eggs. We had a similar thing happen in our own backyard where we found many eggs a whistling duck couple culled from their nest.

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    1. Nature has its ways and reasons that we don't always understand.

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