Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day - October 2020

Welcome to my zone 9a garden in Southeast Texas. Here's what's blooming this month. 

Tithonia, aka Mexican sunflower, with a grateful bumblebee.

Coral vine.

The lycoris, hurricane lilies, or better known as naked ladies have bloomed sparsely this October. I think they were affected by our long dry period.
 
Evolvulus glomeratus, 'Blue Daze' groundcover.

Another groundcover, wedelia.

The Cape honeysuckles have bloomed gloriously all month but they are almost spent now.

Clerodendrum bungei, 'Cashmere Bouquet' aka Mexican hydrangea.

Even some of my succulent plants on the patio have been blooming.

Duranta erecta with a few blooms and its berries called "golden dewdrops."

Lantana.

Turk's cap.

The chrysanthemums are only just beginning to bloom.

'Calwell Pink' rose.

Blue plumbago.

Some of the crinums are getting in a few last blooms before taking their rest.

Hamelia patens, aka hummingbird bush.

Buddleia.

'Old Blush' antique rose.

Firespike.

Fennel.

Still a few aster blossoms left.

The jatropha got moved to a new location in the spring and apparently it is happy there because it has bloomed profusely all summer long.

Last but hardly least, my 'Lady of Shallot' rose continues to bloom.

Thank you for visiting with me this month. I hope that you and your loved ones are staying safe and well during this pandemic and that your garden is flourishing. Be sure to visit Carol of May Dreams Gardens, our host for this monthly meme. Happy Bloom Day!


Comments

  1. I am drooling over this, Dorothy, as our gardens here wilt and turn to brown - but the leaves on the trees are glorious!

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    1. You get colorful leaves while ours just generally turn brown and fall off. Maybe that's the trade off.

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  2. Wow, that Coral Vine is a stunning plant. Probably is like a few other things you have here that I could not grow up here in Canada. :) It is always a joy to see pictures of plants that are new to me... which I may never see in person!

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    1. You've hit on one of my favorite things about this monthly meme - I can visit gardens around the world and see plants that I would never be able to grow in my garden.

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  3. Enjoyed all your blooms. The lighting on the lycoris is wonderful. Hurricane lilies, I suppose well named. Your light peach rose also is beautiful. Fortunate bee - the ones here are finishing up for the season - our warm spells are almost over up here. And, as usual, your garden will help me through the cold, snowy months.

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    1. Whoever started calling them hurricane lilies obviously recognized that they bloom just as the hurricane season is winding down.

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  4. Aren't Mexican red sunflowers too bright to believe are real? They have a metallic look to them. You have so many unusual (to me) blooms still.

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    1. My crop of the Mexican sunflowers this year seem especially bright and orange to me. I'm not sure why but I like it and so do the bees.

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  5. What beautiful color! I was especially happy to see the Lady of Shallot rose. We planted one this year and we did get a bloom or two, but in spite of our watering the rose bed, growth was slowl

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    1. My 'Lady' was slow to get started, too. It's now in its fourth year and has bloomed continuously throughout the summer and fall.

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  6. Oh my, what a lovely assortment of beauties here. I especially love the first capture but they are all lovely.

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    1. Those Mexican sunflowers really are the star of the show in my garden just now.

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  7. I'm drawn to the coral vine and need to look into adding it to my garden. None of my Lycoris have made an appearance but our continuing dry conditions may be a key factor there.

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    1. Yes, I generally get a lot more blooms from Lycoris, too - not this year.

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  8. Wow so much beauty! I love the colors -- like the blue daze and the pink rose. But what about the hummingbird bush --- do you get a lot of hummingbirds there? Sorry to say our garden is done for the season .... tomorrow night is a snowstorm ... so we are buttoning down the hatches ...

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    1. We do indeed get a lot of hummingbirds. Just now the Ruby-throats are migrating through the area, along with a few Black-chinned and Rufous. We sometimes have Rufous Hummingbirds that overwinter here, so I leave my feeders out year round.

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  9. I love how some of the blooms are looking more beautiful after the touch of sunlight on them ,I haven't been fortunate to see surprise lily blooming in my garden except once in few years. It would be my pleasure if you join my link up party related to Gardening here http://jaipurgardening.blogspot.com/2020/10/garden-affair-fruit-harvest.html

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    1. One of the things I love about October is the quality of the sunlight and what I always think of as the "October blue" of the sky. I suppose it is the result of the changing angle of Earth in its journey around the sun.

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  10. Thanks Dorothy for linking up with Garden Affair.Keep on linking .

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  11. So many blooms! I'm partial to peach colored roses, so beautiful.

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    1. So am I. I particularly love my Lady of Shallot.

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