Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day - June 2020

Happy June Bloom Day to all! I hope the day finds you well and your garden flourishing.

Here in Southeast Texas, the combination of hot, humid days and little or no rain has done a number on my garden. Parts of it are parched, possibly beyond recall, but the more stalwart of my plants continue to bloom in spite of all hardship.


 The yellow cannas have been especially pretty this month.


The blanket flowers wilt in mid-day but still continue to send out blooms.


As do the gerbera daisies.

The blue plumbago is undaunted. The shrubs are covered in these flowers.
  
The milkweed has been blooming nicely but has had few Monarch or Queen butterfly visitors.


 Plectranthus 'Mona Lavender.' 


 Foxgloves suffer from the weather but are still blooming.


 Petunia 'Laura Bush.'


 Ornamental potato vine.


 Lantana.


 And more lantana.


Beautyberries are, of course, known for their shiny berries rather than their blooms, but here are those blooms.


 Duranta erecta, aka golden dewdrop.


 Peegee hydrangea.


 Clerodendrum 'Cashmere Bouquet,' aka Mexican hydrangea.


 June means the crinums are beginning to bloom.


 And more crinums.


 Justicia 'Orange Flame.'


 Summer blooming chrysanthemums.


Native sunflowers.


The 'Peggy Martin' rose got a severe pruning several weeks ago to combat a bad case of blackspot, but it came back this month and rewarded us with another flush of blooms.


 And the "Lady of Shalott' just goes on and on.


The large almond verbena shrub is covered in these tiny, fragrant white flowers.


 Borage.


 Summer phlox.


The blooms of the 'Purple Ballerina' datura have ripened into these seedpods called "devil's apples." 


 A bank of mixed four o'clocks.


 In the little goldfish/frog pond, the pink water lilies are blooming.


Buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis) is a favorite with pollinators.

And there you have a look at the plants that continue to brighten my garden and my life with their flowers. Thank you for visiting. I look forward to visiting your garden in turn.

Thank you, Carol of May Dreams Gardens for hosting us once again.

Comments

  1. Buttonbush! I have planted one and await the unique blooms. I've never seen a PeeGee hydrangea so pink - do you know the variety? Sorry to hear about your heat.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love my buttonbush with its weird little flowers. The hydrangeas may appear so pink because of the shade, but they are in fact a dark pink. Their variety name is lost to me. The two shrubs were a Mothers Day gift from my children a few years ago.

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  2. Lots of colour despite the harsh conditions you describe. I can barely imagine living in the kind if heat you have to endure in Texas.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Heat is our constant companion pretty much throughout the year, but it has been bad lately. And dry.

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  3. Still a wonderful selection despite your drought. (If you saw my lantanas, you would laugh and laugh). Roses just started to bloom here in the last couple of weeks - enjoyed yours, and the plumbago. I remember seeing mona lavender in Florida. Have a good week!

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    Replies
    1. I've gotten quite fond of that 'Mona Lavender.' I got it a year ago and it has so far performed well in my garden.

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  4. These are very nice pictures. My wife and I used to grow both flowers and vegetables but because of long work hours we have forgone the gardening this year.

    But Happy Bloom Day!

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    Replies
    1. I understand. I never had much time for gardening during the years when I was working full time and raising a family. Gardening has been one of my compensations for growing older!

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  5. "Yellow cannas" must be a type of iris? My mother had a gorgeous garden on irises, roses and peonies (all varieties). Such pretty flowers and so many new to me.

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    Replies
    1. Cannas are a different family from irises, but they are similar in that they both grow from bulbs or corms and, yes, the flowers do have some likeness. The canna plant is much more tropical in appearance. They can get quite large, up to 3-5 feet tall in some varieties, and have very big decorative leaves.

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  6. Wow, for having dry conditions your plants have done a great job giving you so much colour. Ah, I do remember growing borage once upon a time, the bees lived it. I'm loving your crinums. Sorry, picked these wrong post first timed round. Enjoy your garden and all the pollinators that visit it :-)

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    Replies
    1. You are right about the borage - the bees do love it!

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  7. Last year Eleanor and I tried sunflowers in a big pot on our deck. Got a couple to grow, but the they died suddenly. The pot is huge so I thought there was enough room for two. We were super bummed.

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    Replies
    1. I've never tried growing them in pots. Something like the dwarf tithonia which has masses of orange blossoms and only gets three to four feet tall might grow in a big pot.

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  8. A wonderful assortment of blooms!
    I have never heard of mums that bloom in the summer - very interesting.
    Have a blessed day!

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    Replies
    1. These bloom in the fall and repeat bloom in late spring to early summer. I'm not sure of the variety name.

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  9. I love the relation we share every month of having same blooms in our respective gardens. Buttonbush is very pretty.Happy blooms day.

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    Replies
    1. I always enjoy my visits to your garden each month, Arun. It's always lovely to see what we have in common even though we are half a world apart.

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  10. You have such a lovely garden. I am very intrigued bu the datura. I used to have them, but there didn't develop the kind of seed pods that your does.
    Nancy at https://garden337.com/?fbclid=IwAR0ZFp4MygBbbY8ktbZDTjWPJ7dW2sDkGFEbvdpHOJil3qpFJby0ZJMEWCI

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    Replies
    1. I find the seed pods of the datura as interesting as their "devil's trumpet" flowers.

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  11. So many blooms and wonderful color! Great job fighting the rough weather. I'm in southern middle Tennessee and sympathize with you.
    Jeannie@GetMeToTheCountry

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The weather is a trial for both garden and gardener at this time of year, but we soldier on and do the best we can.

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  12. I always love looking at your blooms! We were blessed with a benevolent spring this year and that is not always the case. My yard has made staying at home way more than tolerable!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Our spring was relatively pleasant as well, but then summer came early as it often does here.

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  13. What fabulous blooms! I'm happy to see your colors today as it's a dreary winter day for me.


    Feel free to share at My Corner of the World

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    Replies
    1. Ah, it may be winter there, but on the plus side, New Zealand has Covid-19 under control. Amazing what competent leadership can accomplish!

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  14. So your potato vine blooms too. The lime-green vine I have produces a flower unlike the regular potatoes, and much later in the season.
    -Ray

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    Replies
    1. The variety name of the vine is unfortunately lost to me, but it is variegated evergreen and puts out a few of these tiny blooms throughout the year. It grows quite rampantly on the north side of my house and I have to prune it several times a year to keep it in check.

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    2. And I just found that name. It is Solanum jasminoides.

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