Garden Bloggers Bloom Day - November 2018

Welcome to my zone 9a garden in Southeast Texas where we had our first light freeze of the season last night. The temperature barely dipped below the freeze mark but it was enough to turn many of my garden plants to brown mush. I had proactively taken my succulents and a few other potted plants to the garage to protect them, but those that were in the ground were on their own.

This freeze was actually a few weeks early. Our normal average first freeze date is December 10. Does this portend a colder than usual winter like we had last winter? We know that our weather patterns are changing but it is not yet entirely clear how they are changing or to what extent. Time will tell.

The cold night did not affect my roses that were in bloom.


'Lady of Shallott.'


'Peggy Martin' blooms profusely in spring but she also gives us some secondary blooms in the autumn.


'Julia Child.'


The freezing temperatures nipped the tips of some of the petals of this 'Belinda's Dream' bloom but it was mostly unaffected.


However, a lot of my plants looked like this porterweed today. It'll have no more blooms to feed the butterflies this year.


The Hamelia patens shrubs were frostbitten on top but the leaves nearer the ground were still green. All the blooms were gone, though.


When I knew cold weather was coming, I took some pictures over the weekend. This was the lantana then.


And here it is on Wednesday. Like the Hamelia, the bottom portion of the plant was not affected and the leaves are still green.


Which is probably good news for this caterpillar which was still feeding on the leaves today.


This red dahlia was blooming beautifully on the weekend. No more.


And the marigolds have been at their absolute best over the last couple of weeks.


Looking at marigolds in bloom always makes me happy.


Turk's cap was a bit frostbitten but still in bloom today.


And so are the chrysanthemums.


More chrysanthemums.


The Cape honeysuckle won't last long if we get much colder weather, but so far so good.


And, surprisingly, the blue plumbago was not affected. Apparently, the micro-climate where it lives stayed above freezing.


This 'King Humbert' canna was just about to bloom, but it won't now.


My few purple echinaceas are hanging in there.


And the few leaves still hanging on my little Japanese maple have turned this brilliant shade of burgundy. Nice to have some color still in the garden.

Thank you for visiting and participating in Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day and thank you Carol of May Dreams Gardens for hosting us.

Happy Bloom Day and happy Thanksgiving.

Comments

  1. Newton's third law says 'For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.' It is the action of all the hot air from the politicians before the elections that has caused this opposite reaction - freezing cold weather!
    Happy Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day!

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  2. It was sad to see an early freeze so far south - my friend in Orlando says they had a cold front come through weeks early. It was still nice seeing your roses and other flowers (even if some of them were pictures taken a few days ago.) We are under a winter storm warning - was 8 to 12 inches of snow, now 5 to 9 inches of snow changing to ice, and then back to snow. Wish us luck!

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  3. Amazing that your roses still look so pretty. Happy GBBD.

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    Replies
    1. It has to get into the 20s before they really are greatly affected. The buds that are there now will probably all still bloom. We're not expecting any more freezing weather anytime soon.

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  4. The roses are the clear winners, though you still have a few blooms and lots of color. It felt like 20F last night here. This morning about the same and we are getting the first snowfall this afternoon/night. You are right in saying that winter weather patterns are changing though it remains to be seen how we we'll be affected.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Some of our neighbors actually reported a few snowflakes on Tuesday morning, so I guess we've had our first snow already, although I didn't see it.

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  5. It's always sad to experience that first freeze and realize that, no matter how much we'd like to be in denial, summer is definitely gone for another year. There's still a lot of color going on in your garden.

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    Replies
    1. It's just part of the cycle that we learn to accept, like 100 degree weather in July and August, but it did come a bit earlier than anticipated. However, I actually enjoy the pleasures of the winter garden. Less weeding!

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  6. We have a really mild winter in our region ,so I cant imagine how it would be that freezing.loved the shots of Lantana,Plumbago,cape honeysuckle ,I hope you will get blooms in the upcoming months .
    Have a great week ahead.

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    Replies
    1. Our winters are generally quite mild - and sometimes hot - as well, but we did have a bit more cold weather than usual last winter and we'll just have to see how things go this winter.

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  7. This changing climate is sure challenging. We have had the lowest humidity possibly ever for the past week due to Santa Ana winds plus ash from the fires. Combined with the cold nights of the desert, I feel as though my plants are asking me what's up?

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    Replies
    1. It can be confusing for both the garden and the gardener. Those wildfires are just terrifying, even from a thousand miles or so away. Stay safe.

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  8. So many beautiful blooms! I'm not going to envy you though, your summers are probably very hot.
    Lovely marigolds. Mine looked like cooked spinach a few mornings ago.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Some of my marigolds that were in more protected spaces survived the freeze, but most, like yours, look like "cooked spinach." Summers are definitely our least favorite season here and, unfortunately, it lasts about half the year!

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  9. Looks like we got colder than you did up here in North Texas. I haven't had time to see what, if anything, made it through the weather. We had already gotten everything inside that needed to go there, so that was good. Gald that some of your more tender things made it.

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    Replies
    1. It got colder than I anticipated (31 degrees) but not as cold as the forecasters had predicted (28) for which I am thankful. At least I know that everything that looks dead right now will be back in the spring, except for the annuals, of course, and even many of them will reseed.

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  10. Oh i always feel sad when someone from temperate countries say that the frost is coming, as that means the plants will die early. That is very true in your garden, and that little larva might not be able to pupate before it succumb to frost. They say with the changing climate the cold countries will have longer winters and we, hot climates will have long dry and hot season. Maybe it really is true as we already feel the heat this early in November, as if we are already at the temperatures in March. Oh my God, can we really withstand these changing climate patterns? Take care.

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    Replies
    1. It is a challenge and if we were wise we would be working constantly to ameliorate or reverse the trend. Unfortunately, at present, our country's government is short on wisdom and that is bad news for the planet.

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  11. My plants suffered the same fate. Camellias are still putting out blooms, though, but that's it!

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    Replies
    1. Today our temperatures will hover around 70 again. What a weird season fall is here!

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