Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day - February 2019



 Does one daffodil make a spring?


Maybe if you add a few narcissi. 


And some sweet little leucojum, aka snowflakes - the only kind of snowflakes we'll see here this winter. 


 The pansies have been blooming since fall and are well past their prime.


As are the violas.

The Turk's cap also has been blooming all winter, but, in the absence of a freeze, it blooms 12 months of the year in my garden. 


A few gerberas are still going. 


They just bloom on and on and on... 


The Carolina jessamine is not in full flower yet but it's getting there.

The feverfew, too, has been in bloom for quite a while and shows no sign of waning.


Salvia greggii (autumn sage) is another native plant that blooms almost year-round here.


 The white yarrow continues to bloom by the goldfish pond.


'Peggy Martin' rose has already been flowering for more than a month.


 Purple oxalis is at its best in winter here.


 The loropetalum is a mass of fuchsia blossoms now.


I do love its fringy little blooms.

Thank you for stopping by my zone 9a garden in Southeast Texas this month. Spring is just around the corner here and on most days this week, it has felt as if it had already arrived.

This month, our host, Carol of May Dreams Gardens, begins her thirteenth year of hosting this monthly meme. Amazing! Twelve years of bringing together gardeners from around the world to share their gardens. Thank you, Carol. I'm looking forward to the next twelve years.

Happy Bloom Day!

Comments

  1. Beautiful!
    Happy Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day!

    ReplyDelete
  2. And thank you for giving me hope, as you do every winter. How I wish Carolina Jessamine was hardy where I live but alas...at least I can enjoy your offerings virtually. Happy GBBD to you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Carolina Jessamine is certainly the reliable staple of my late winter garden.

      Delete
  3. Very beautiful!! I mostly have vetch, dianthus, dandelion, violas, and forsythia that just started bloom in my used to be zone 7b but now is according to all the catalogs I receive zone 8a!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Those plants you named are all wonderful winter bloomers.

      Delete
  4. Such color and variety! My autumn sage is cut to ground level, and yarrow and feverfew nearly are, but they have lots of new growth. Especially the yarrow. I also have many transplants from broken off pieces of yarrow! It is so easy to propagate.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I need to cut my autumn sage back. I've been negligent about that and a lot of other winter garden chores. Yes, everything is growing here - especially the weeds!

      Delete
  5. It is amazing how many things are beginning to bloom here despite the extreme lack of sun during weeks of rain. I guess those plants just know somehow what time it really is.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Oh we have few blooms in common loved the frilly blooms of loropetallum ,My bulbs have not came to blooming stage yet.Have a great week ahead ,its always pleasure seeing your posts.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The loropetalum is special to me. It just seems to shout, "Spring is here!" Happy gardening to you, Arun.

      Delete
  7. You have quite the number of blooms right now! My Leucojum are nowhere near blooming. So cool to see that things bloom all year round in zone 9!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's especially true in years like this when we have barely even had a winter.

      Delete
  8. Oh, you are definitely experiencing Spring! ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  9. There are so many wonderful blooms in your garden. It is definitely starting to look like spring is on the way! Your roses are gorgeous!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Most of my rose bushes have just been pruned, but ‘Peggy Martin’ just gets light grooming as needed so it blooms right through the spring.

      Delete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Poetry Sunday: Excerpt from The Cure at Troy by Seamus Heaney

Open Season (Joe Pickett #1) by C.J. Box - A review

Poetry Sunday: Invitation by Mary Oliver