Poetry Sunday: To the Light of September by W.S. Merwin

It's still hot here, still summer, but in the freshness of the early morning and late afternoon breezes I swear I can feel just the merest hint of autumn to come. Welcome, September. 

To the Light of September


by W. S. Merwin

When you are already here
you appear to be only
a name that tells of you
whether you are present or not

and for now it seems as though 
you are still summer 
still the high familiar 
endless summer 
yet with a glint 
of bronze in the chill mornings 
and the late yellow petals 
of the mullein fluttering 
on the stalks that lean 
over their broken 
shadows across the cracked ground 

but they all know 
that you have come 
the seed heads of the sage 
the whispering birds 
with nowhere to hide you 
to keep you for later 

you 
who fly with them 

you who are neither 
before nor after 
you who arrive 
with blue plums 
that have fallen through the night 

perfect in the dew

Comments

  1. How perfect for these last (hopefully) days of summer! This summer was hot but good, in New England at least. ;-)

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    Replies
    1. We've had worse summers - at least we've had rain. Temperatures are beginning to moderate just a bit and that is good.

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    2. We had lots of rain, which helped a great deal. I didn't use to appreciate rain as I do now. It's a nuisance but so necessary! This coming week is going to be in the 90s F again, and very humid, something I truly hate. (!!!) :-)

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  2. One of the most precious things to me is the way the light changes as the seasons move along. Loved the poem.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm delighted to read your comment about the light. I've often commented on that to my hubby, but he just doesn't see it. You give me confirmation that I'm really NOT crazy and not imagining it!

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