Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day - May 2022

Can it really be May Bloom Day already? Carol Michel says so and I must believe her since she is the original instigator of this monthly post.

So, here goes. We've had a dry spring so far and it is looking like a dry summer but many of my tough old plants don't seem to notice.

 

This red salvia for example.


The 'Hot Lips' salvia started blooming earlier and is almost finished with its first blooms now.


I love these hot orange blossoms of the pomegranate.

 

Not quite in full bloom yet but this buddleia will soon get there.


This sweet-smelling vine is by my back porch.


These ancient cannas haven't done much for me so far, but they'll get going soon and bloom throughout the summer.

Blue plumbago doing its thing.

And yellow cestrum doing its.

'Darcy Bussell' rose almost finished with its first cycle of bloom.

'Julia Child' rose.

'Lady of Shallott' rose just a bit past its prime.

I have lost the label for these blooming plants and have racked my brain trying to remember their name. My brain is not cooperating. Perhaps you recognize them.

These little violas came up as "volunteers" in one of my pots, so I dug them out and gave them their own little pot. They have bloomed and bloomed for me for a couple of months, but they are beginning to fade a bit now.

If it's May, there must be daylilies of course.

I'm especially fond of this one.

Some of my blooms are late this year. We did have a winter that lingered a bit. This coreopsis is just beginning to get going.

Tropical milkweed.

Justicia 'Orange Flame.'

This larkspur has bloomed profusely for me but it is almost done now.

The pots by my patio have petunias, salvia, and yellow cockscomb. It looks like the cockscomb is getting crowded out.

Purple echinacea.

Rudbeckias are among my most dependable bloomers.

The yarrow by the little goldfish pond continues to bloom.

Four o'clocks or, in this case maybe six o'clocks.

The pansies in the pot on my patio table have bloomed all winter and now spring and they are just about finished but still gamely sending out a few blooms.

The clematis has put on quite a show recently.

And, of course, what would be May without at least one sunflower. The birds plant them all around my yard and I mostly let them grow unless they are interfering with one of my intentional plantings. 

I hope you and your garden are enjoying a productive and stress-free spring. Happy Bloom Day!

Comments

  1. Isn't May wonderful for the surplus of flowers we can show our readers? You are way ahead of us in New York State with the roses, daylilies and sunflowers, and some of the others are plants that won't grow here but I enjoyed each and every one. I don't know your mystery plant but the sweet smelling vine looked like some kind of honeysuckle. Enjoy your flowers!

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    Replies
    1. The vine is in the honeysuckle family but its name eludes me at the moment. I'm afraid my brain isn't working very well today.

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  2. Beautiful! Wonderful!
    Happy Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day!

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    Replies
    1. And to you, Lea. I enjoyed my visit to your garden.

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  3. I think your mystery plant is Heliotrope, Dorothy. It's one of the lovely plants I've found impossible to grow in my climate. Your garden is looking lovely despite the dry conditions but I hope you get some rain. We're dry in southern California too but hoping for rain here before October is pointless. Happy GBBD!

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    Replies
    1. I believe you are correct about the heliotrope. Thanks for jogging my memory.

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  4. So many wonderful blooms I won't see for months! Still, my gardening isn't year-round, so there's that.

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    Replies
    1. It is true that in our climate there is always gardening to be done.

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  5. I love all the colors in your garden! Amazing how early the pomegranates are blooming in your climate. Mine are just starting to leaf out again.

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    Replies
    1. Oh, yes, spring is hastening right into summer here and many of my spring bloomers will soon be finished.

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  6. Your garden looks quite splendid, Dorothy, quite amazing really, considering the heat these plants have to endure.

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    Replies
    1. My plants are most old tried and true varieties that have been in my garden for years and can take the heat. I seldom plant anything exotic.

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  7. You should be proud of such an amazing garden. It would make me happy to see this garden each day like you probably do.

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    Replies
    1. Of course, I'm only showing you the relatively good parts! Let's don't talk about the weeds.

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  8. Lady of Shallott, GORGEOUS ROSE!! I had lavender in the garden, but went on my trip for 10 days and they really need a big bunch of water since it's scorching hot in The Netherlands. and I think my BF forgot to do it every day, even though he says he did it... So all my lavender is dead now.... Hopefully I'll get to tend to our garden a bit better in our new house :)

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    Replies
    1. You are getting a new house? How exciting! Good luck with the move.

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  9. Happy Bloom Day! You have so many wonderful blooms and the Blue plumbago and Justicia 'Orange Flame.' really caught my eye. It's nice seeing the sunflower too. We have to wait until late summer to see them here.

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    1. We have several bird feeding stations in the yard which leads to the birds planting sunflowers all around. They get pulled out if they interfere with other plantings but a lot get left to bloom and brighten my days!

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  10. I'm a sucker for sunflowers. Is it weird that just looking at them makes me a little bit happier?

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    Replies
    1. Not weird at all. It would be a dark soul indeed who couldn't take pleasure from seeing sunflowers.

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