This week in birds - #578

A roundup of the week's news of birds and the environment

This Northern Mockingbird doesn't look too happy about the shower he's getting!

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The U.S. is getting a new global climate representative since John Kerry is stepping down.

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The fossil fuel industry knew of the danger of climate change as early as 1954 but resisted doing anything about it.

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Here is a depiction of Earth breathing for one year.

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Drought is having a deleterious effect on the Panama Canal.

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The first bird flu deaths have been reported in Gentoo Penguins in the Antarctic.

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Trees are good for us. Is there really any doubt of that?

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This is the American Bird Conservancy's Bird of the Week. It is a neotropical falcon, the Collared Forest-Falcon.

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Patagonia, the outdoor apparel brand, is following its philosophy when making its charitable donations.

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Remember Flaco, the Eurasian Eagle-Owl that escaped captivity (with a little help) a year ago? Well, he's still out there, flying free, making it in New York. And if you can make it there... 

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It's well established that parrots are very clever birds and they use their beaks to help them navigate through trees or the perches in their cages.

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A stingless bee of the Amazon is endangered and the race is on to try to save it.

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Small dogs with pointy noses generally live longer than their larger and/or flat-faced relatives.

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After five days of freedom, a Japanese macaque that escaped from a wildlife park in Scotland has been recaptured.  

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Was he a Chinese spy? This pigeon was suspected of being one but he has now been released after eight months of captivity in Mumbai.

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This is a placoderm, a fish that lived during the Devonian Period. Apparently that strange lower jaw helped it to grasp and hold its prey.

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Reef scientists are concerned that back-to-back cyclones may have damaged the Great Barrier Reef.

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When one thinks of wildfires one doesn't usually imagine them occurring in the normally wet country of Colombia, but that is what has been happening recently.

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Imagine the benefits to easing the climate crisis and improving human health if we were to move toward a sustainable global food system.

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And imagine the benefits to the climate if we appreciated swamps and refused to drain them.

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Rocky Raccoon is at it again - this time disrupting things in Toronto.

 

Comments

  1. Good morning, Dorothy. Thank you for the roundup. I am very happy to see that one of Toronto’s renowned Raccoons is in the news. A pox on those who wish to have these animals euthanized. They are smart, engaging and an integral part of the urban landscape. It’s the dumb humans who don’t secure their trash properly who are the problem and no one calls for them to be euthanized! Vive Rocky Raccoon, I say! All the best - David

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rocky's relatives pay us a visit just about every night. I frequently see them investigating our back porch when I'm sitting in my den. They are welcome here.

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  2. Oh, that poor mockingbird. Great photo!

    There is so much interest in dogs. I can see that many people would love to know more about dog longevity.

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  3. Love that mockingbird pic. He does look a little miffed. :D

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  4. ...and Arvid Gustaf Högbom in 1896 noted that industrial activity was adding carbon dioxide to the atmosphere!

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  5. I'm happy to see that Flaco is doing well in the Big Apple.

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    Replies
    1. Yes, it is definitely a story with a happy ending - at least so far.

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  6. It would be a bit shocking to see a monkey or macaque in one's backyard. 5 days on the lam -- he seems lucky to have been found ....though it seems he had an adventure.

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