This week in birds - #561

A roundup of the week's news of birds and the environment

It's beautyberry season in my yard. The berries come in purple like these and in white. I have some of each and both colors are equally loved by the birds who will feast on them and strip them away pretty soon.

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Summer's incredible heat continues to be the main news in Nature. All of the northern continents are basically broiling at the moment.

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As Earth heats up, its birds, like this Willow Flycatcher, are adapting. 

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In some good news for the planet, Ecuadorians have voted to halt drilling for oil in an Amazonian national park.

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This is the ‘akikiki, a critically endangered Hawaiian bird. Its caretakers are struggling to preserve and bring it back and now they face the new threat of the Maui wildfires.

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In New Haven, Connecticut, an 82-year-old man is on a mission to convince his neighbors to plant more trees.

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The oldest yet fossil of a dicraeosaurid (plant-eating) dinosaur has been found in the Thar Desert of India.

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Is the warming ocean a threat to some of the fish that live in it? It seems that the damselfish may be in distress because of the heat.

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Massive winter downpours have resulted in unprecedented blooms in California which has been a boon to conservationists collecting seeds to preserve endangered plants.

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Crocodiles are very vocal reptiles and scientists are eager to try to understand what they are saying.

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An unprecedented flash flood in the Grand Canyon this week caused about 100 people to have to be evacuated from the area.

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This bird looks too incredible to actually be real but it is. It is a Brazilian bird called the Gilt-edged Tanager and it is the American Bird Conservancy's Bird of the Week.

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A recent study found that mountain treelines are moving higher in response to climate change.

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The last two survivors of Brazil's Piripkura tribe have been found and now the question is what Brazil should do regarding them

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This is a rare spotless giraffe that was born recently at a zoo in Tennessee.

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Off the coast of California, female pearl octopuses are nesting, creating an "octopus garden" where they protect their eggs. 

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A hot, wet summer is threatening to put a damper on the leaf-peeping season in the Northeast.

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Geckos are famous for their ability to camouflage themselves but this one from Madagascar may be the champion in that regard.

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Finally, here are a few bird pictures from a wonderful spot for viewing birds, the Bosque del Apache refuge in New Mexico.

Comments

  1. Good Morning, Esteemed Bringer of Mostly Bad News! This morning, however, I will focus on just one of your snippets and the good feeling it engenders. Many years ago I spent a couple of days at Bosque del Apache NWR and I have wonderful memories of around 30,000 Snow Geese, 4,000 Sandhill Cranes and more Ferruginous Hawks in one place than I have ever seen in my life. And, back in the day I was still eating red meat and had a green chilli cheeseburger in San Antonio, that lived up to its reputation. Ah…..memories!

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    Replies
    1. We visited Bosque in October a few years ago and marveled at those flocks of Snow Geese, Sandhill Cranes and Ferruginous Hawks. What a sight! And sound!

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  2. Love the color of those berries...and that they bring more birds to your yard. :D Enjoy your weekend!

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    1. My favorite aspect of the beautyberries is their ability to attract birds!

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  3. Love your links to the environment and wildlife. We saw a red tailed hawk at the botanical garden today, which I've never seen before in that place. We were all intrigued.

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    1. Red-tailed and Red-shouldered are the hawks I most commonly see soaring over my yard, often in the company of Black or Turkey Vultures.

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  4. I wonder if I'm the only one who started hearing Ringo Starr singing about an octopus's garden when I saw the link about the female pearl octopuses?

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    1. Ha! And now I'm going to have that song in my head all day!

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  5. I always like the photos you choose here. Not sure the brown giraffe knows what all the fuss is about. And I like to think of an octopus garden somewhere underwater.

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  6. I hope that all animals and plants will be able to evolve, like the Willow Flycatcher, to live in the new hot world we humans have created. In a perfect world, I suppose, all the animals and plants would adapt, except humans.

    The bird photos are lovely. One bird blogger I like to visit is Shiju Sugunan at Cranium Bolts. He lives in Bangalore.

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