This week in birds - #551

A roundup of the week's news of birds and the environment

A Black-throated Sparrow feeding on the ground, photographed during a trip to West Texas. 

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Super Typhoon Mawar hit Guam this week, creating devastation over a wide area.

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A breakthrough agreement to protect the drought-strained Colorado River was reached this week.

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Orcas seem to have finally had it with us humans and they are fighting back! It started off the coast of Spain and Portugal and the behavior may be spreading.

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The current iteration of the Supreme Court seems intent on destroying our hard-won environmental protections. This week it was the Clean Water Act.

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The Bahamas are facing an existential threat as the sea levels continue to rise.

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It seems that climatologists are finding this hurricane season particularly unpredictable.

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Attempting to climb Mount Everest has always been a perilous adventure but this week has been particularly deadly.

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I confess a fondness for these (to me) lovely spiders, maybe partially because they are persecuted. They are Joro spiders and if you see one, please do not harm it.

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Deep-sea mining poses significant hazards for the environment and these activists are trying to stop it

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Recycling plastics, thought to be a good thing, can itself carry some unintended consequences.

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Recent discoveries in northern Guatemala suggest that the ancient Maya civilization was far more advanced than previously thought.

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Meanwhile in southern Mexico, a controversial megaproject known as the Maya Train is generating significant protests.

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An armored mouse? Nature is full of marvels.

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Reducing the plastic pollution of the oceans may actually be easier than one might think.

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The spring migration of hummingbirds is just about complete and the little guys are shifting into breeding mode.

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Toronto's Don River was pronounced dead in 1969, but thankfully its obituary was a bit premature.

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We've all probably heard of saber-toothed tigers but it seems there were other saber-toothed critters wandering across the Permian landscapes.

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Certain countries are believed to be most likely to become dangerously hot during the next century.

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I love toads and I hope you do, too. They are indeed "heroes of the garden."

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America's need for green energy is running up against the need to preserve and conserve areas that are rich in ice-age fossils.

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Zoo Miami managed to offend the entire nation of New Zealand by allowing members of the public to pet their kiwi. And why in the world would they have ever thought that was a good idea?


Comments

  1. Good morning, Dorothy. Thank you for the weekend roundup, filled as always with links to thought-provoking environmental topics. I am especially pleased that you included the feature on the Don River in Toronto, an area that I know well, and I knew Charles Sauriol, one of the heroes mentioned in the piece, and I have his book. The river has made a remarkable comeback but not without the fierce advocacy and dogged determination of a group of dedicated activists. The politicians only climbed on board when it became obvious that they could paint themselves into a very favourable corner. I have watched Belted Kingfishers patrolling the river again. Now, if only we could get rid of that traffic noise! Perhaps one day electric cars will do that too! With my very best wishes - David

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    1. Ah, the traffic noise! Yes. It is persistent and pervasive where I live, too.

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  2. I am happily surprised by the agreement about the Colorado River. That's something hopeful.

    But the actions of the Supreme Court in regards to the environment? Reprehensible. Startling.

    One of the naturalists in our group is obsessed with spiders. She is currently spearheading a spider survey of Brazoria County. Her love for spiders is contagious.

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    1. I'm a big fan of spiders myself so hooray for your naturalist friend! As for our "Supreme" Court, reprehensible decisions seem to be their forte.

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  3. Hello Dorothy, I'm not so fond of spiders but I wouldn't kill them either:) I love hummingbirds and look forward to them on my deck with an array of red and deep pick potted plants .I'm sure I've missed plenty on your blog these last months but, I can see again -AMEN . I finally did a blog post with an update and some summer picks; have a good summer.https://bibliophilebythesea.blogspot.com/2023/05/its-been-while-bit-of-life-and-books.html

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    Replies
    1. Welcome back, Diane. It is so good to know that you are doing better!

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  4. I was very happy to see the agreement on the Colorado River.

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    1. It's a step forward and all such steps, however tiny, are welcome.

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